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Corporal Punishment in the Bible: A Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic for Troubling Texts

Corporal Punishment in the Bible A Redemptive Movement Hermeneutic for Troubling Texts William Webb confronts those often avoided biblical passages that call for the corporal punishment of children slaves and wrongdoers How should we understand and apply them today Are we obligated to

William Webb confronts those often avoided biblical passages that call for the corporal punishment of children, slaves and wrongdoers How should we understand and apply them today Are we obligated to replicate those injunctions today Or does the proper interpretation of them point in a different direction Webb notes that most of the Christian church is at best inconsisWilliam Webb confronts those often avoided biblical passages that call for the corporal punishment of children, slaves and wrongdoers How should we understand and apply them today Are we obligated to replicate those injunctions today Or does the proper interpretation of them point in a different direction Webb notes that most of the Christian church is at best inconsistent in its application of these texts But is there a legitimate basis for these lapses Building on the findings of his previous work, Slaves, Women and Homosexuals, Webb argues that the proper interpretation and application of these texts requires ascertaining their meaning within the ancient cultural historical context In recognizing the sweep of God s redemptive purposes already evident in the Old Testament and fulfilled in the New, we remain truly biblical.

What Is Corporal Punishment Is It Still Allowed Corporal punishment is a physical punishment which inflicts pain as justice for many different types of offenses This punishment has been historically used in schools, the home, and the judicial system While this is a general type of punishment, it is often most associated with children, and the U.N Committee on the Rights of the Child defined Corporal punishment Britannica Corporal punishment, the infliction of physical pain upon a person s body as punishment for a crime or infraction Corporal punishments include flogging, beating, branding, mutilation, blinding, and the use of the stock and pillory In a broad sense, the term also denotes the physical disciplining of children in the schools and at home. Corporal punishment Corporal punishment WikiMili, The Best Corporal punishment or physical punishment is a punishment intended to cause physical pain to a person It is most often practised on minors, especially in home and school settings Common methods include spanking or paddling It has also historically been used on adults, particularly on prisoners and enslaved people. Facts About Corporal Punishment Verywell Family Corporal Punishment Definition of Corporal Legal Definition of corporal punishment punishment inflicted on a person s body see also cruel and unusual punishment Note The prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment in the Eighth Amendment to the U.S Constitution imposes limits on the use of corporal punishment on convicted offenders and prisoners. Corporal punishment legal definition of corporal Corporal punishment arises in two main contexts as a method of discipline in schools and as a form of punishment for committing a crime Corporal punishment, usually in the form of paddling, though practiced in U.S schools since the American Revolution, was only sanctioned by the U.S Supreme Court in the late s.

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  1. William J. Webb says:
    William J. Webb Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Corporal Punishment in the Bible: A Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic for Troubling Texts book, this is one of the most wanted William J. Webb author readers around the world.

Comment 191 on “Corporal Punishment in the Bible: A Redemptive-Movement Hermeneutic for Troubling Texts

  1. John Dekker says:
    This is a book arguing against smacking spanking children Webb particularly interacts with organisations such as Focus on the Family, which advocates smacking, but suggests a parent administer no than two smacks at a time Webb argues that such an approach is not biblical at all, in the sense that it has moved beyond what he calls the Bible s concrete specific instructions Webb points out that the Book of Proverbs encourages using a rod on the back, rather than a hand on the bottom Webb than say [...]

  2. Matt Bianco says:
    This is one of those books I received months and months ago, but didn t read because it wasn t the right time I read it over the last few days, apparently it was the right time, and I am intrigued The writing is a bit clunky at times, but Webb makes some interesting observations that I think will lead to most people even those who support corporal punishment being a bit open to the idea of alternative approaches to discipline.What he says Basically, he views the Bible through a redemptive movem [...]

  3. Matthew Richey says:
    Personal note I grew up with unabusive by my definition of abuse corporal discipline and have no anger or bitterness about it but I ve recently ceased using it because I have not found it particularly effective and have begun to feel uncomfortable with it If you ve read Slaves, Women, and Homosexuals which I recommend , you ll be able to predict where and why Webb comes down where he lands His analysis of the Old Testament and its relation to ANE legal texts is helpful and helps put difficult Ol [...]

  4. Ben Copeland says:
    A solid starting pointWebb makes a solid case that the spare not the rod passages in the Bible need to be interpreted within the wider context of the OT, which in context unquestionably supports beating both children and adults practices that are unanimously considered abusive today He shows that discipline can only be biblical in the literal sense of the oft quoted Proverbs passage if we essentially beat the daylights out of fools naughty children or adults But goes on to show that true allegia [...]

  5. Adam Shields says:
    Short Review This is a very good exploration of what hermeneutics is all about Webb takes the idea of corporal punishment and traces what we see in scripture and compares is to how modern Christians understand their role as parents in light of scripture What Webb is really doing is giving a good illustration of his concept of the redemptive movement hermeneutic All hermeneutical systems have their weaknesses, but this does work well in this area and you can see how it would work in other areas a [...]

  6. Jason says:
    Makes a strong biblical case against spanking children and other forms of corporal punishment , and argues instead for creative and effective noncorporal means of discipline The writing is a bit wooden and repetitive at times, but the arguments are very clear and convincing I did lots of highlighting The postscript on noncorporal discipline techniques is especially helpful.

  7. Matthew says:
    I will post of a review later However, I think it is great that some mainstream Christian resources are starting to point out that the use of corporal punishment, on children, does not have much of a defense in the Bible, or the church.

  8. Bethany says:
    Well written, clear, and persuasive at least to me.

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