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From the Country of Eight Islands: An Anthology of Japanese Poetry

From the Country of Eight Islands An Anthology of Japanese Poetry John Ashbery

John Ashbery

  • [PDF] Read ä From the Country of Eight Islands: An Anthology of Japanese Poetry : by Hiroaki Sato Burton Watson J. Thomas Rimer
    499 Hiroaki Sato Burton Watson J. Thomas Rimer

About Author

  1. Hiroaki Sato Burton Watson J. Thomas Rimer says:
    Hiroaki Sato born 1942, is a Japanese poet and prolific translator who writes frequently for The Japan Times He has been called by Gary Snyder perhaps the finest translator of contemporary Japanese poetry into American English.

Comment 879 on “From the Country of Eight Islands: An Anthology of Japanese Poetry

  1. Steve says:
    This is the longest book of poetry I have ever read It is beautiful and allows for the great scope of change in Japanese poetry.My personal favourite poem was, In Praise of Sake by Otomo No Tabito I just love the line, Rather than be a so so human being, I d like to be a sake jar and get steeped in sake I really enjoyed the poetic form, Renga, and have discovered new poets I want to check out, like Ishikawa Tabuboku and Tomioka Taeko I am always concerned about translations, especially regarding [...]

  2. Aidan Collins says:
    There are the masters, of course I m tired of children to anyone who says that, no flowers Matsuo Bash But then there are such gems as At midday when the sea s visible in the window, through the pine trees, I kiss the hair of someone sleeping peacefully Wakayama BokusuiandKissShe came home, smelling of another man.And so I could not kiss her.Then the two of us got under the quiltsthat still held the sun s heat.That day the weather was nice all day.And yet I could not kiss her.She pressed her bre [...]

  3. George says:
    This book is to Japanese poetry what Sunflower Splendor is to Chinese verse see my review of the latter In particular, the translations of the great lost Surrealist, Takiguchi Shuzo, are themselves enough to recommend this magnificent book.

  4. Patrick T. Randolph says:
    This is a brilliant collection of Japanese verse that takes the reader through each century with a whisper and a wink.

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