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In the Bazaar of Love: The Selected Poetry of Amir Khusrau

In the Bazaar of Love The Selected Poetry of Amir Khusrau I vow to diethat you might look my way See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love Amir Khusrau poet courtier mystic musician straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge

I vow to diethat you might look my way.See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love.Amir Khusrau poet, courtier, mystic, musician straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures His poetry in Persian appealed equally to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh, Nizamuddin Auliya It was appreciateI vow to diethat you might look my way.See how many have died like me in the bazaar of love.Amir Khusrau poet, courtier, mystic, musician straddled the worlds of politics and religion and helped forge a distinctive synthesis of Muslim and Hindu cultures His poetry in Persian appealed equally to the Delhi sultans and to his Sufi sheikh, Nizamuddin Auliya It was appreciated not only in India, where his Hindavi poetry has survived through a lively oral tradition, but also across a cosmopolitan Persianate world that stretched from Turkey to Bengal Khusrau s poetry has thrived for centuries and continues to be read and recited to this day But despite his vast literary output, there is a dearth of translations of his work In the Bazaar of Love offers new translations of Khusrau s poems in Persian and Hindavi, many of which are being translated into English for the first time Paul Losensky s translations of Khusrau s ghazals, including his mystical and romantic poems, comprise fresh renditions of old favourites while also bringing to light several little known works Sunil Sharma brings us many of Khusrau s short poems, including those belonging to the qawwali repertoire, as well as a mixed prose and verse narration The Romance of Duval Rani and Khizr Khan.The first comprehensive selection of Amir Khusrau s poetry, In the Bazaar of Love covers a wide range of genre and forms, evoking the magic of one of the best

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  1. Amir Khusrau Paul Losensky Sunil Sharma says:
    Ab ul Hasan Yam n ud D n khusrow 1253 1325 CE Hindi , Urdu , better known as Am r Khusraw also Khusrow, Hazrat Khusrow, Ameer Khusru Dehlaw meaning Amir Khusrau of Delhi was a Sufi musician, poet and scholar He was an iconic figure in the cultural history of the Indian subcontinent He was a mystic and a spiritual disciple of Nizamuddin Auliya of Delhi Am r Khusrau is reputed to have invented certain musical instruments like the sitar and tabla The roots for tabla invention are found in India The carvings in Bhaja Caves in the state of Maharashtra in India shows a woman playing Tabla and another woman performing a dance, dating back to 200 BC Taals has developed since the Vedic or Upanishad eras in India He wrote poetry primarily in Persian, but also in Hindavi A vocabulary in verse, the h liq B r , containing Arabic, Persian, and Hindavi terms is often attributed to him.He is regarded as the father of Qawwali a devotional music form of the Sufis in the Indian subcontinent , and introduced the ghazal style of song into India, both of which still exist widely in India and Pakistan He is also credited with introducing Persian, Arabic and Turkish elements into Indian classical music and was the originator of the khayal and tarana styles of music.Khusrau was an expert in many styles of Persian poetry which were developed in medieval Persia, from Kh q n s qasidas to Nizami s khamsa He used 11 metrical schemes with 35 distinct divisions He has written in many verse forms including ghazal, masnavi, qata, rubai, do baiti and tarkib band His contribution to the development of the g hazal, is significant from

Comment 121 on “In the Bazaar of Love: The Selected Poetry of Amir Khusrau

  1. Aseem Kaul says:
    A disappointing read Losensky s diction is tone deaf and stilted, hovering awkwardly between the archaic and the contemporary his grasp of the poem s meaning is frequently superficial and his willful neglect of form you can barely tell these poems are ghazals in the original is hard to excuse That these poems still retain some power is a testament to Khusrau, his subtle genius barely discernible beneath the turgid translation The man deserves a better translator.

  2. Garima Gupta says:
    The only reason to thank the translators is that they made these masterpieces of ghazals available to a non Persian speaking person like me It takes a bit of effort wine makes it easier to get over the awkwardness of English, to express emotions that just refuse to flow musically in that language But once you get past that the emotions are divine


  3. Jibran says:
    Poetry is difficult to translate but translations between languages that share no common cultural roots is even difficult, so when the originals follow a highly formal set of rules and metrical systems that are simply impossible to translate without taking liberties with the original, in which case the final product looks like a rendition or an adaption than a translation The problem with this edition is that a rather literal and flat translation has been attempted that does not capture the b [...]

  4. Alisia Barringer says:
    Some very interesting Sufi poetry, love poems essentially but spiritual as wellI like the personality of these poems, they are eccentric, strange, but seem very personal,with a kind of intimacy, they come from a real place not lofty but really focused on detailsof ordinary life, poignant, and often very sad Brilliant stuff Precursor of Rumi and other great Persian sufi poets

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